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How Big is 22 Ounces

How Big is 22 Ounces? Demystifying Promotional Product Sizes

Buying items online can be difficult. You can’t touch the product or hold it in your hands to get an idea of how big it is before you place your order. You could pay for your order only to discover when it arrives at your office that it is too big for the event you had in mind, or too small to fill with other promotional items you purchased.

Here at Quality Logo Products®, we try to prevent these problems by offering free samples of many of our products (up to #7 with free UPS shipping for qualified addresses/customers), and having a sales team standing by to answer questions and recommend products. We do have restrictions on how many free samples we can send you and our sales team members haven’t quite mastered mind reading. So how do you get an idea of how big something is before you place your order or spend money ordering a million different samples?

The simple answer is, compare it to something you have in front of you.

On each of our products we list the product size. For water bottles that includes the height and width as well as the capacity, often in ounces.

Updated Screenshot

You could use a tape measure to find out how tall the product is in comparison to the items on your desk, and you could do all the math to find out how many cups are in 22 ounces and estimate from there.

Let’s take a closer look at some of these bottle sizes and try to better understand exactly how big they are. Bottles sized 20 oz. such as the Cycle Bottle for example, hold about the same amount of liquid as 1 2/3 soda cans (which hold 12 ounces each). A 31 oz. bottle will hold slightly more than 2 and a half soda cans, and a 40 oz. bottle will hold about 3 1/3 cans. The largest personal water bottle we sell, the Glacier Water Bottle, will hold up to 5 1/3 cans of soda.

Bottle to Can Comparison

You’ve probably noticed from these graphics, or if you’ve searched for any kind of water bottle on our website, that we have a LOT of options. You can buy water bottles in nearly any size, from 4 ounces to 64 ounces. There is a big difference between a 4 ounce bottle and a 64 ounce bottle (60 ounces to be exact) so how do you know which bottle is a good size for your customers?!

Unless you know your customers like their water in small doses or drink like a fish, it can be difficult to find the perfect size for your customers. Below is a chart of different water bottle sizes and their popularity to help you choose something your customers are sure to love.

Bottle Popularity Graph

If you’re on the fence about what your customers will want, try one of our popular sizes: 20, 24, 28, or 32 ounces.

Hopefully all these informative graphics have helped you get a better idea of what size bottle you will need for your next event, or at least have helped you picture exactly how big the bottles you want to order are. Shopping online can be a tricky process, but here at Quality Logo Products®, we want to make sure shopping with us is a great experience every time.

Do you have any tricks you use to make sure you know exactly what you’re getting before you order online? Do these graphics help with your online shopping? Share this post with your friends and colleagues and comment below!

*Please note that prices and promotions on screenshots may change at any time.

Quality Logo Products®



Julie Foster

Julie enjoys almost any creative outlet and isn't afraid to show off her geeky side. She can't help but love puns and witty banter, and she appreciates a well-crafted advertisement. She is a super fan of the Georgia Rae Family Band. Currently, Julie is looking for new ways to improve her Japanese.

Comments

  1. Kelly Bird

    What a great resource Julie! Everyone can relate to how much volume a can of soda holds so this is a perfect visual aid. Thanks for the great post. 🙂

  2. Matt

    Another super informative article! Sometimes it is very hard to visualize just how big a 31oz or 24oz bottle is. It also important to remember that for cups and tumblers the amount that the item holds is when it is filled to the absolute rim. So you if you fill your 12oz stadium cup with 12oz of pop (NOT soda. Ever.) you won’t have any room in your cup and will probably be spilling some.

    • Julie

      Sometimes bigger water bottles are better too. I have a 31oz bottle that I never seem to fill up all the way, but use almost every day!
      It’s also helpful that is has ounce measurements on the side so I can still keep track of how much water I’m drinking.

  3. Kat D.

    This post is AWESOME and very helpful!!!! Thank you for doing all this leg work to help educate our customers (and us)!

  4. Ryan

    This chart is awesome. There is nothing worse than a bottle that doesn’t hold enough water. “Ain’t nobody got time for that!” Thank you for saving me time, energy, and from complex math equations!

  5. Jay

    Adding this to my list of blog posts to send to customers because they make both of our lives easier!!!

  6. Joe

    Now those are some PRETTY graphics! Pretty informative, too! 🙂

    Awesome stuff, Julie! Drinkware sizes can be tough to guage/quantify, but this definitely helps.

    • Julie

      Thanks to Drea for making these awesome graphics! They really do help visual learners like me.

  7. keith

    Very helpful! Its hard to imagine how big a 24oz water bottle would be. This is a great chart to help out with those questions. Thanks!

  8. Angie

    The chart is super helpful! A great tool to send to my customers.

  9. Jen

    Another great, informative post! It’s hard to visualize an “ounce” size; this puts a lot in perspective. I’m saving this chart for my customers, thank you!

  10. Doc

    Great post, Julie! This is very helpful for customers when ordering for a big event. I always recommend seeing a physical sample as well so they can see the size of the product in person.

    • Julie

      It’s definitely always a good idea to get a sample. I would have a hard time narrowing down all of our options though without something like this to help me picture the size differences!

  11. Chuck

    This is awesome. I cannot tell you how many times a customer has ordered a water bottle or cup and cannot believe the size of it compared to what the stated oz is. I can now direct them here!

    Great post.

  12. Erik

    These are some very helpful graphics. The Cola can reference is great. Who doesn’t know the size of a Cola can practically by heart! With water bottles I think shape is just as important as size. Bikers and hikers needs different types, and so do students and any grade level. It’s good to really know your target audience when choosing a water bottle.

  13. Jon

    Awesome! I am going to put this on every drinkware order quote from now on – a lot of times you can get a high quantity of drinkware items for low pricing, but a 12 oz. cup or a 17 oz water bottle is not the right giveaway for a hot summer function with a lot of adults trying to stay hydrated.
    Also, another thing to account for is Ice – it takes up space/ ounces as well. I am constantly warning people if you want to give a full drink away, you need more than a 12 ounce cup if you are putting 12 oz and ice inside.

  14. greg

    Great info to know. Thanks!

  15. Serenity

    Great Post! This will be very help and useful for customers!

  16. Chase

    This article is awesome! I didn’t know about these comparisons! I am going to use these all the time! Too often people call in and say “Is this a big bottle.” Well what is big or small to you, may not be to me. Many people will be able to use this to figure out what is best for their event!

  17. Ashley

    I’m sending this to my customers with every bottle quote. This makes it so much easier when the customer can visual see the difference. Yet another great blog!

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