Your microfiber cloths will unfortunately not last forever, whether you use them every day or only once a month. The thin delicate fibers can become worn with use over time causing the cloth to become less effective.

Fortunately, there are several ways you can increase the longevity of your microfiber cloths. Learn how you can make the most out of this handy material!

How Long Do Microfiber Cleaning Products Last?

According to Microfiber Wholesale, an average microfiber cloth can last up to 5 years if washed 25 times per year. Ultimately, the longevity of your microfiber cloths depends on several factors like how often you use them, what you use them for, and how well you take care of them.

For example, a microfiber mop you use twice a week might not last as long as a microfiber cloth you use to occasionally wipe the interior of your vehicle. No matter what, you’ll get a lot of use from your microfiber. It’ll just need to eventually be replaced.*

*DISCLAIMER: Not all microfiber is created equal. Number of washes and overall longevity can vary depending on several factors. If you are unsure about how to care for your microfiber cloths, contact the manufacturer.

How Many Times Can You Wash Microfiber Cloths?

The Journal of Hospital Infection conducted a study putting the longevity of microfiber cloths to the test. The study found that after repeated washes, the microfiber cloths worked best at removing bacteria after 75 washes. At 150 washes, the cloths were not as effective but still better than the very first wash.

In order to conduct this study, researchers used 10 different microfiber cloths and tested their ability to remove bacteria from surfaces commonly found in hospitals: stainless steel, furniture laminate, and ceramic tile.

Since there are so many factors that can affect how long your microfiber cloths last, it is difficult to put an exact number on the amount of washes a single cloth can take. However, this study does provide some insight into how effective microfiber can be after heavy use and numerous washings.

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How to Tell Your Microfiber is Worn Out

Signs your microfiber cloth is becoming worn out can include staining, an unreadable label, and a rough feel to the cloth itself. The way your microfiber is manufactured can also affect how quickly it wears. While these signs don’t necessarily mean that the cloth is useless, you should still consider replacing it soon.

The piece of microfiber pictured here has been washed about 125 times and is nearly 5 years old. You can see that overall the microfiber is in good condition, but there is some slight fraying on the edges.

Typically, the first signs of wear on your microfiber cloths will be visual. If you notice frayed material or streaks while cleaning, your cloths might be close to needing replacement.

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How to Make Your Microfiber Last Longer

You can increase the shelf life of a variety of microfiber products with the right tips and tricks. Here’s how it’s done from product to product: *

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Microfiber Mop

  • Consider the type of flooring you have as rougher floors such as concrete can wear the material faster than smooth hardwood
  • A microfiber mop with a foam-core will keep its shape after washing and can improve the grip to the mop head

Microfiber Clothing

  • Avoid wearing rings or bracelets that can snag on your clothing
  • Do not use an iron on microfiber garments
  • Avoid repeated wear to reduce pilling, or loose strands on the fabric
  • Follow the care tag instructions
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Microfiber Cloths

  • Rotate use between several different cloths
  • Using one single cloth every day will cause faster wear, so keep multiple microfiber cloths on hand
  • Consider dedicating one cloth to a certain use or cleaning solution to avoid cross-contamination. Cross-contamination can damage the fibers if your cloths are not washed in-between uses
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Microfiber Furniture

  • Use a vacuum to remove pet hair, dirt, or debris
  • Remove stains with a damp sponge or cloth

Microfiber Bed Sheets

  • Follow care tag instructions
  • Do not use fabric softener because it can cause the fabric to not be as breathable due to clogged fibers

If you have microfiber items throughout your home or workplace, make sure you take proper care of them so they will last for years to come. If you are ever unsure about how to best care for your microfiber, contact the manufacturer to help you make the right decision.

*DISCLAIMER: Not all microfiber is created equal. Number of washes and overall longevity can vary depending on several factors. If you are unsure about how to care for your microfiber cloths, contact the manufacturer.

The Bottom Line

Microfiber is a hardy material that can withstand years of use and hundreds of washes. The most important factor to consider in making your microfiber last longer is to be conscious of how much wear it goes through, and how well you take care of the material.

References

Smith, D. L. et al. (2011) Assessing the efficacy of different microfibre cloths at removing surface micro-organisms associated with healthcare-associated infections. Journal of Hospital Infection, 78(3), 182-186. Doi:
https://www.journalofhospitalinfection.com/article/S0195-6701(11)00110-1/fulltext

Microfiber Wholesale. (2015). How Long Does Microfiber Last? Part 1. Retrieved September 5, 2019, from
https://www.microfiberwholesale.com/info/2010/12/how-long-does-microfiber-last/

Microfiber Wholesale. (2015). How Long Does Microfiber Last? Part 2. Retrieved September 5, 2019, from
https://www.microfiberwholesale.com/info/2010/12/how-long-does-microfiber-last-part-2/

Woodford, Chris. (2019, July 15). Microfiber Cleaning Cloths. Retrieved September 5, 2019, from
https://www.explainthatstuff.com/microfibercloths.html

Maker, Melissa. (2019). How to Clean & Care for Microfiber Cloths! Retrieved September 5, 2019, from
https://cleanmyspace.com/caring-for-your-microfiber-cloths

About the author

Gianna Petan

Meet Gianna - no stranger to all things promo products. Her background in research-based writing, linguistics, and advertising gives her an edge in blogging about the marketing industry.